Action Archive (AA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to urban research through the approaches of oral history and participatory historiography. The founders of AA are Sara Brolund de Carvalho (artist, architect, and educator), Helena Mattsson (professor of architectural history and theory), and Meike Schalk (associate professor of urban design and urban theory at KTH).

Marco Adelfio, Monica Billger, Jaan-Henrik Kain, Hye Kyung Lim, Jenny Sternberg, Liane Thuvander at Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Jennifer McConville at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Beata Stahre Wästberg at University of Gothenburg, and partners from other universities and in practice are a multidisciplinary group of researchers with interests in tools for visualization and dialogue in urban transformation, and backgrounds in architecture, interior architecture, geography, planning, and engineering.

Alberto Altés is an architect and researcher. He studied architecture in Valladolid, Barcelona, and Delft, and critical theory in the Independent Studies Programme in Barcelona (MACBA). His PhD thesis is entitled Delaying the Image: Towards an Aesthetics of Encounter. He runs the architecture practice LandLab Arkitektur in Umeå.

Jenny Andreasson is an architect with a critically oriented architectural practice.

Lenastina Andersson is an architect and PhD student in Architectural History and Theory at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. For the last seven years she has been part of the team transforming the Nationalmuseum building at Blasieholmen in Stockholm.

Tim Anstey is an architect and a professor of theory and history at AHO Oslo School of Architecture and Design. From 2011 to 2013 he was co-director of the Swedish ‘strong research environment’ Architecture in the Making. His current research project, Things that Move, presents a revisionist reading of canonical texts in architectural history to open up discussion of architectural work – whether it is to be constituted through the design of objects or through processes.

Thordis Arrhenius (SAR, PhD, professor of cultural heritage, Linköping University) is an architect and architectural researcher with a strong interest in contemporary architectural and urban practice and associated theories. Her teaching and research are characterized by dedication to contemporary critical issues in heritage and urbanism where the historical perspective informs actions and strategies. Recent publications include Place and Displacement: Exhibiting Architecture (eds. Arrhenius, Lending, McGowan, and Wallis), Lars Müller Publisher, Zurich, 2014 and Experimental Preservation (eds. Arrhenius, Langdalen, and Otero-Pailos), Lars Müller Publisher, Zurich, 2016.

Oya Atalay Franck is an architect and the dean of the School of Architecture, Design and Civil Engineering at ZHAW Zürich University of Applied Sciences. Her research focuses on architecture education, research into architecture, research by design methods, the development of spatial concepts in architecture, modern architecture of the 1930s, and the relationship between globalization and urbanism.

Tom Avermaete is a professor of architecture at Delft University of Technology. He has a special research interest in the public realm and the architecture of the city in Western and non-Western contexts. As the chair of methods and analysis, he focuses on the changing roles, approaches, and tools of architects. His research examines precedents – design attitudes, methods, and instruments – with the explicit aim of constructing a critical basis of design knowledge and influencing contemporary architectural thinking and practice.

Anders Bergström is an associate professor of history and theory at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm. His research focuses on the relationship between architecture and knowledge production in the humanities, ranging from studies of individual architects and public buildings to professional strategies, heritage practices, and national historiographies.

Ana Betancour is an architect and rector at UMA School of Architecture, Umeå, Sweden. She is also a professor in architecture and urban design.

Nils Björling is an architect and researcher with a focus on developing theory and method to increase the interplay between local and regional planning. His main objectives are to support design practice in urban planning, addressing challenges caused by uneven geographic development, and to include a broader range of resources and potentials in the planning process.

Bojan Boric is an architect and urban designer with several years of international teaching and working experience. Originally from Belgrad, Serbia, he moved to New York where he studied architecture at Cooper Union and Columbia University. Since 2003, he has lived and practiced in Stockholm where he is currently a PhD candidate at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment.

Ellen Braae is a professor of landscape architecture theory and method and the head of the research group Landscape Architecture and Urbanism. She is trained as an architect and landscape architect from Aarhus School of Architecture, where she also received her PhD. Braae’s research interests include the preservation and transformation of the post-industrial urban landscape, design and transformation, theory and practice of cultural heritage and landscape, ecology and aesthetics, urban development, and the meaning, appearance, and function of open urban spaces/landscapes.

Karin Bradley is an associate professor of urban and regional studies at the KTH School of Architecture and Built Environment (KTH ABE) with a research interest in environmental justice, alternative economies, and utopian thought.

Ola Broms Wessel is an architect based in Stockholm. Together with his partner Klas Ruin, he runs the architectural practice Spridd. Spridd’s vision is that of ‘green social architecture’, which takes account of social relationships and human behaviour. Spridd believes that a resource-efficient approach to building entails evaluating what is really needed and seeking new approaches to sharing spaces, avoiding unnecessary construction, reusing where possible, and, when new construction is needed, planning thoroughly and economically to strengthen social relations.

Brady Burroughs is an architect, teacher and researcher whose recent dissertation, Architectural Flirtations: A Love Storey, focuses on design education in intersections of gender, race and sexuality. Her queer-feminist work explores improper and unserious practices to unsettle habitual modes of criticism and to relocate and reimagine a serious and privileged architectural discipline.

Ragnhild Claesson researches the intersections of urban planning, architecture, and cultural heritage practices, focusing on spatial politics, inclusions/exclusions, and gendered relations. Ragnhild also works part time at the Institute for Studies in Malmö’s History (IMH), a research institute at Malmö University.

Fran Cottell is an artist. She has produced installations, public interventions and performance since the 1970s; working collaboratively and individually, on social, feminist, environmental and domestic artworks and curatorial projects.

Ulf Cronquist has a doctorate in English literature from University of Gothenburg and an MA in cognitive science from Lund University, Sweden.

Dana Cuff is a professor, author, and scholar in architecture and urbanism at the University of California, Los Angeles where she is also the founding director of cityLAB, a think-tank that explores design innovations in the emerging metropolis (www.cityLAB.aud.ucla.edu). Cuff has published and lectured widely about post-war Los Angeles, modern American urbanism, the architectural profession, affordable housing, and spatially embedded computing. Two books have been particularly important: Architecture: The Story of Practice, which remains an influential text about the culture of the design profession, and The Provisional City, a study of residential architecture’s role in transforming Los Angeles over the past century. Her urban and architectural research spans the oceans, addressing cases in Sweden, China, Japan, and Mexico. In 2013 and 2016, Cuff received major, multi-year awards from the Mellon Foundation for the Urban Humanities Initiative, bringing design and the humanities together at UCLA.

Halina Dunin-Woyseth is an architect, PhD, professor emerita at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design.

Catharina Dyrssen is a professor emerita in architecture and design methods at Chalmers University, architect, musicologist, artistic researcher, former member of the cross-disciplinary research group Urban Sound Institute, and member of the Swedish Research Council’s Committee for Artistic Research. Her research and PhD supervision has mainly linked three themes: artistic and design-based research methods; intersections of art, architecture, music, sound, and urban space; and applications of design thinking in urbanism and public space.

Victor Edman, architect and PhD, is an associate professor of history of architecture at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment in Stockholm. In a series of research projects, he has dealt with various aspects of the formation of a national heritage in modern Sweden.

Magnus Ericson is an independent curator and project co-ordinator based in Stockholm, Sweden. In the fields of design, architecture, and art, his practice has over the years encompassed institutional and independent commissions as well as teaching. Between 2014 and 2016, he was responsible for the professional postgraduate course Organising Discourse at Konstfack University College of Arts, Crafts and Design. From 2009 to 2014, he was a senior advisor/coordinator and curator of a new design-related programme at the Swedish Museum of Architecture (now ArkDes) in Stockholm. Between 2007 and 2009, he was a project manager at Iaspis, the Swedish Arts Grants Committee’s international programme, to advance their activities in the fields of design, crafts, and architecture. Between 2003 and 2006, he was a curator and project coordinator responsible for the Magasin 3 programme at Stockholm Konsthall’s satellite project space, Magasin 3 Projekt.

Hanna Erixon Aalto is an architect with experience of numerous urban planning and design projects. Her PhD research at KTH is driven by collaboration with scholars and practitioners from the fields of systems ecology, resilience science, environmental history, planning, urban design, landscape architecture, and the arts.

Paula Femenias is an associate professor at Chalmers University of Technology with expertise in industrial design, qualitative social research, and urban/rural sociology. Her research addresses the sustainable development of the built environment from a perspective of innovation. Her goal is to improve our knowledge of how the building sector works and performs in relation to goals for low-energy buildings and sustainable development. She is a member of the ‘strong research environment’ Sustainable Integrated Renovation (SIRen).

Murray Fraser is the vice-dean of the Bartlett Faculty for the Built Environment at UCL. He has published extensively on architecture design, architectural history and theory, urbanism, globalization, post-colonialism, design research, and cultural studies and won numerous awards for his research, publications, doctoral supervision, and regeneration work. He is the co-editor of the series Design Research in Architecture and the current editor-in-chief of the ARENA Journal of Architectural Research (AJAR), an online open-access journal.

Hélène Frichot is an associate professor and director of critical studies in architecture at the School of Architecture KTH (Royal Institute of Technology) Stockholm. Coming from a background in both architecture and continental philosophy, Hélène works with her colleagues on issues of gender and feminist practices in architecture. Her research and pedagogy engages in the relay between critical theory and creative practice.

Kristina Fridh is a researcher and the director of PhD Studies at HDK. From 2006 to 2009, she was the project leader of “The Materiality of the Surface”, financed by the Swedish Research Council. The project focused on use of materials connected to different cultures’ conceptions of space, with references to Swedish and Japanese architecture, and glass as a building material. The focus of the current research project "Urban Materiality - Towards New Collaborations on Textile and Architectural Design" is the field of textile architecture (2016 to 2018, funded by the Swedish Research Council, Artistic Research).

Lena From is the head of Art is Happening at the Public Art Agency Sweden. She has long experience of working with public art, that is, art located in places where people live their everyday lives: streets, squares, workplaces, schools, and eldercare centres. Before Lena From started working in art, she worked as a journalist, in particular, providing local coverage for provincial newspapers all over Sweden.

Hannes Frykholm is an architect and PhD researcher trained at the LTH School of Architecture and the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley. His practice explores the dissolving boundaries between architecture and infrastructure in the neoliberal city. 

Paulina Prieto de la Fuente (PhD) is a Malmö-based square-aficionada architect.

Catharina Gabrielsson is an associate professor in urban theory and director of the Centre for a Sustainable Built Environmentat the School of Architecture KTH (Royal Institute of Technology) Stockholm. Catharina’s research centers on the relationship between architecture, art and urban development, employing critical and creative writing as a means for exploration. Bridging across aesthetics, politics and economics, her practice combines fieldwork operations with archive and literature studies drawing on recent thinking in philosophy.

Jon Geib is an urbanist and architect whose doctoral research explores the potential of engaging the city through multiple simultaneous and interactive approaches, drawing inspiration from undervalued qualities of dialogue: multivocality, indirectness and incommunicability. He holds a bachelor's degree in Architecture from The University of Texas at Austin and master's degrees from KU Leuven in Human Settlements and in Urbanism and Strategic Planning.

Janina Gosseye is a postdoctoral research fellow at both Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands), where she is part of the Methods and Analysis Group, and at the University of Queensland (Australia), where she is a member of the Centre for Architecture Theory Criticism History (ATCH). Her research considers the notion of collectivity in post-war architecture and is situated at the nexus of architectural theory and social and political history. In 2012, she completed her PhD on the construction of new collective spaces in post-war Flanders, entitled On Common Ground? New Public and Collective Spaces in Flanders, 1950s–1970s at the University of Leuven (Belgium). Currently Gosseye is exploring the post-war development of shopping centres in Western Europe and Australia.

Marcelyn Gow is a partner and founding member of servo los angeles. She received a Dr.Sc. from the ETH Zürich. Gow is faculty of the Southern California Institute of Architecture SCIArc in Los Angeles. She has also been a visiting professor in architectural technology at KTH Scool of Architecture and the Built Environment in Stockholm.

Kristina Grange (PhD 2005, docent 2015) is a professor of urban planning and design theory at the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg. She has an interest in post-structuralist and political theory and their implications for urban planning and design. Her own research applies a discursive approach, by which she seeks to expose taken-for-granted perceptions in social practices, and discuss their material, political, and democratic consequences. Her current research is exploring spatial inequalities and uneven geographic development. She leads the Urban and Regional Transformations research group.

Sten Gromark, PhD, is a Professor of Architecture, Architect SAR/MSA, at Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden. He has been active in research into architectural sociology in international cooperation concerning residential issues, and has published reflections on the influence of philosophical concepts in contemporary European architecture, based on humanistic and social science-oriented interpretations.

Katja Grillner is a professor of critical studies in architecture and currently serves as dean of faculty at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment (2015–). She was the director of Architecture in Effect (2011–2015), funded by Formas (2011—2017). She cofounded the feminist architecture teaching and research group FATALE in 2007.

Karin Grundström is a senior lecturer in urban studies at Malmö University. Her ongoing research concerns urban processes in the cityscape of Malmö. The research project Transforming Dual Cities investigates urban fragmentation and projects to build a more sustainable city through the paths of communication and densification. Her research project Urban Separatism in Sweden investigates new lifestyles in Swedish cities. She is a member of the ‘strong research environment’ Critical Urban Sustainability Hub (CRUSH), which explores the acute housing shortage in Sweden. In 2016, CRUSH published 13 Myter om Bostadsfrågan (13 myths of the housing question).

Johanna Sofia Gullberg is an architect, currently writing her PhD thesis and participating in an experimental housing project, Eksperimentboliger by Nøysom Arkitekter, in Trondheim. She has worked at the Umeå School of Architecture and at the architectural firms of Anders Wilhelmson and Thomas Sandell.

Ulrika Gunnarsson-Östling is a researcher at KTH ABE, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering concerned with long-term planning from the environmental justice and gender perspectives.

Björn Hellström is an adjunct professor in urban design at the KTH School of Architecture and senior researcher at Tyréns in Stockholm. Hellström is the leader of the project DECODE – Community Design for Conflicting Desires within the framework of Vinnova’s programme Driving Challenges Towards Innovative Environments. DECODE (www.decodeprojektet.se) develops supportive planning processes based on cross-sectoral collaboration between various divisions within municipalities, the private sector, and academia, and in which citizens and local actors engage actively.

Maria Hellström Reimer is a professor of design theory with a fine arts background and a PhD in landscape architecture, conducting interdisciplinary research into theoretical and applied aesthetics and politics of design, including questions of values and norms, experimentation, and change.

Michael Hensel is an architect, PhD, professor, and director of the Research Centre for Architecture and Tectonics at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design.

Lars Hesselgren is an architecture and urbanism researcher, Visiting Professor at Chalmers University of Technology and Director of Research at PLP/Architecture, where his current focus is on technologies that underpin our assumptions of design in the built environment. He is currently leading research and concept design for CarTube, a pioneering mobility solution that combines two existing modes of transport, automated electric cars and mass transit, into a single, seamless underground road system.

Sandi Hilal is an architect and researcher. She headed the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) Camp Improvement Program in the West Bank (2008–2014). Togehter with Alessandro Petti, she is a founding member of DAAR, an architectural studio and artistic residency programme that combines conceptual speculations and architectural interventions (www.decolonizing.ps). Alongside research and practice, Hilal is engaged in critical pedagogy and is a founding member of Campus in Camps, an experimental educational programme run by an Al Quds University/Bard College partnership hosted by the Phoenix Center in Dheisheh Refugee Camp, Bethlehem (www.campusincamps.ps).

Katja Hogenboom works as architect, teacher, and PhD researcher. She is interested in other routes of ethical and social possibility, a renewed idea of sociality, that experiments with emancipatory possibilities from within – co-opting the system – which can be imagined or dissected from current experiments in architecture.

Lena Hopsch is a senior lecturer at Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Gothenburg, Sweden, and an associate professor/docent at University of Gothenburg.

Ebba Högström is a senior lecturer in Urban Studies and the Director of the Master’s programme in Urban Planning at Blekinge Institute of Technology. Her material–semiotic research concerns the architecture and planning of societal institutions, with a special interest in post-asylum geographies and (auto)ethnographic approaches to experiencing, analysing, and representing space.

Nel Janssens is an associate professor at University of Leuven. Her research addresses meta-urbanism, projective research, and poetic knowledge building.

Sepideh Karami (PhD) is an architect, researcher and teacher at KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. In her PhD thesis, Interruption: Writing a Dissident Architecture, she develops a political practice of architecture through dissident ways of writing and making critical fiction. She has graduated from Iran University of Science and Technology with an MA in Architecture in 2001. Since graduation, she has been committed to teaching, research, and practice. In 2010, she earned her second master’s degree in Design for Sustainable Development at Chalmers University of Technology, and between 2010-2015 she worked as a guest researcher at Umeå School of Architecture.

Ulrika Karlsson is a partner and founding member of Brrum and servo stockholm. She is a professor of architecture at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. She is also a professor at Konstfack/University College of Arts, Craft and Design, where she is chair of the interior architecture programme.

Daniel Koch is a researcher and teacher at the KTH School of Architecture and a practicing architect at Patchwork Architecture Laboratory. He is currently heading a development project for the research area Sustainable Urban Design. In addition, he is the Vice Director of the national ‘strong research environment’ Architecture in the Making.

Sandra Kopljar is an architect and lecturer at Lund University, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Department of Architecture and Built Environment. Kopljar has been teaching at the School of Architecture and the School of Industrial Design, LTH, since 2008. Her research concerns urban development and the design processes connected with professional design methodology and pedagogy. These research interests merged in her thesis project How to think about a place not yet (2016) and are further investigated in the artistic research project TELE SCOPE.

Olga Kordas is a researcher at the Division of Industrial Ecology (IE), Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering (SEED) at KTH and the director of the KTH Energy Platform, responsible for facilitating interdisciplinary energy research and enhancing collaboration with funding institutions, industry, local authorities, and other societal stakeholders in Sweden and internationally. She is the coordinator of the Strategic Innovation Programme for Smart Sustainable Cities (SIP-SSC) supported by Formas and Vinnova (2017–2029). Her main research areas are complex system simulation, energy system analysis, participatory backcasting for strategic energy planning, and engineering education in sustainable development.

Thérèse Kristiansson is an artist, architect, educator, and researcher based in Stockholm. She is part of the design, art, and architecture collective MYCKET.

Mattias Kärrholm is a professor of architectural theory at Lund University. He conducts research into territoriality, public space, urban design, everyday life, and building types.

Anne Legeby, PhD, is a researcher and teacher at the Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture, Stockholm and practices at Sweco Architects. She is specialised in urban design with a focus on the role of urban form in relation to urban segregation, urban life and equal living conditions.

Tor Lindstrand is a senior lecturer at the University of Arts, Crafts and Design / Konstfack and previoulsy, associate professor at the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH School of Architecture. He is a co-owner of Larsson Lindstrand Palme Arkitektkontor AB. His practice oscillates between architecture, art, and performance in numerous cultural contexts. In 2010, he founded Economy together with art director Jessica Watson-Galbraith, working with architecture, art, education, and performance. He has been involved in the collaborative research project Power, Space and Ideology at the KTH School of Architecture and Södertörn University.

Cecilia Lundbäck is a partner and founding member of Brrum. She is a lecturer in architecture at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment and has also taught at Konstfack/University College of Arts, Crafts and Design.

Marja Lundgren has a Master’s of Architecture from Chalmers University of Technology. She has had additional training in building physics and the environmental impact of buildings and post-graduate training in architecture from Royal University College of Fine Arts. Maja Lundgren has been working since 1999 as an advisor on sustainable design and became a partner in the Scandinavian architecture firm White Arkitekter AB in 2004. 

Jennifer Mack is a researcher at the School of Architecture and the Built Environment at KTH Royal Institute of Technology and at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research at Uppsala University. She combines history, ethnography, and formal analysis to study social change and the built environment.

Jesper Magnusson is an architect and senior lecturer in urban studies at Malmö University (MAH), Sweden. His research focuses on the complex relationships between social/public life and the design of urban space. He has a background as a practicing architect as well as a lecturer at Lund University Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Sweden.

Lars Marcus is an architect and professor in urban design specializing in the analysis of spatial form and how its structure shapes social, economic and ecological urban systems. He is the founder and partner of the consultancy Spacescape.

Louise Masreliez is the head of Svenska Arkitekters Riksförbund (Swedish Architects Association). She is the principal of Marge Arkitekter, a Stockholm-based architecture practice. Masreliez has worked as an architect since 1994 and cofounded Marge in 2002. She has been involved in many of the firm’s complex building projects, negotiating cultural and historical significance in sensitive environments with multiple stakeholders.

Helena Mattsson is professor in architecture history and theory at KTH School of Architecture. Currently, she serves also as the head of department.

Ramia Mazé is the professor of New Frontiers in Design at Aalto University in Helsinki. As a researcher and educator, she specializes in critical and participatory approaches to design for systems and products that alter social practices and public life.

Jonathan Metzger is an associate professor at the Division of Urban and Regional Studies at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. Most of Jonathan’s research deals with decision-making concerning complex environmental issues – often (but not exclusively) with a focus on urban and regional policy and politics. In his work he relates to, and finds inspiration in research debates within the subject areas of Planning Studies, Human Geography, STS (Science- and Technology Studies) and Organizational Studies.

Pablo Miranda Carranza is an architect and a PhD candidate at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. His work concerns the theory and history of computation, history of design, and history of architecture.

Marianne Mueller is an architect and a founder and director of Casper Mueller Kneer Architects based in London and Berlin and professor for architectural design and building typology at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart.

MYCKET consists of the designers, architects, and artists Mariana Alves Silva, Katarina Bonnevier, PhD, and Thérèse Kristiansson. Since 2012, they have developed their artistic research from intersectional perspectives such as anti-racist and queer–feminist theory. MYCKET’s practice is informed by the theatrical, the carnivalesque, and political activism. Together they rummage through the borderlands of the lives we live and of the built environment that surrounds us.

Emma Nilsson is an architect and associate senior lecturer working at Lund University, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Department of Architecture and Built Environment. Nilsson has been teaching since 2002 at both the School of Architecture, Lund University and the Department of Urban Studies, Malmö University. Her research focuses on the relationships between architecture and everyday life, with a special interest in how architecture makes and shapes different bodies and bodily cultures and in how the architectural discipline imagines different bodies and thereby conceptualizes different ‘users’. Through practice and teaching addressing photography and how visualization works in architecture, this interest has developed into the artistic research project TELE SCOPE. 

Fredrik Nilsson is an architect, PhD, professor of architectural theory at Chalmers University of Technology, and head of Research in Practice at Älvstranden Utveckling AB.

Norell/Rodhe is a Stockholm-based architecture practice founded by Daniel Norell and Einar Rodhe. Ranging from commissions to speculative research, their work to date includes competition-winning cultural projects, such as the new H. C. Andersen Museum in Odense, as well as the internationally acclaimed installation Erratic.

Ola Nylander is a professor at Chalmers University of Technology and the director of CBA Centrum för Boendets arkitektur (Centre of Housing Architecture). His transdisciplinary research examines housing and involves stakeholders such as public housing companies and the Hyresgästföreningen (Swedish Union of Tenants). In 2013, he published Svensk bostad 1850–2000 (Swedish housing 1850–2000). He is a member of the research environment Architectural Inventions for Dwelling, Ageing and Healthcare (AIDAH). He writes regularly about architecture in newspapers and the architectural press.

Joan Ockman is an architecture educator, historian, writer, and editor. She is Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design and Visiting Professor at Cooper Union and Cornell University School of Architecture. She taught for over two decades at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, where she also directed the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture from 1994 to 2008. Among her numerous publications on the history, theory, and criticism of architecture are Architecture School: Three Centuries of Educating Architects in North America (2012), The Pragmatist Imagination: Thinking about Things in the Making (2000), and the award-winning Architecture Culture 1943–1968: A Documentary Anthology (1993). She is currently collaborating on a major new history of modern architecture, to be published by Thames & Hudson in 2018.

Anna Maria Orrù's work blends together biomimicry, artistic research, architecture, and urban design, particularly as concerns urban food issues and embodied performance, to provide alternate approaches in ecological urbanism and architectural thinking. Her projects navigate between these spheres, staging bodily interventions using a butoh-inspired choreography to inform modes of transformative practice.

Janek Ozmin is an architect and a PhD student at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. He has taught at the Umeå School of Architecture (2014–2016) and Dublin Institute of Technology (2010–2012). In 2007, he founded Ozmin Architecture and has since developed a series of commissions ranging from private houses to public buildings and urban proposals.

Katrin Paadam, PhD, is a Professor of Sociology at the School of Business and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia. Her theoretical interests lie in conceptualizing the dual nature of identity construction and the symbolic meaning of architecture at the intersection of spatial practice and the materiality of urban residential and public spaces.

Christina Pech is a lecturer in architectural history and theory at the KTH School of Architecture and Built Environment. She is currently pursuing research at ArkDes into the historiography of Swedish modern architecture. In 2017, she is a visiting fellow at the Brussels Centre for Urban Studies (BCUS) researching early modern scientific spaces.

Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen is an architect and an associate professor at the Yale School of Architecture. Her scholarly work focuses on twentieth-century European and American architecture with an interest in the genesis and meaning of architectural form in various national and historical contexts. She has published widely and her book Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future (Yale, 2006) received the Philip Johnson Award and the Sir Banister Fletcher Award. Her work Alvar Aalto: Architecture, Modernity and Geopolitics (Yale University Press, 2009) won the Alice Davis Hitchcock Award. She is currently a design associate with Turner Brooks Architects.

Constantin Petcou is a Paris-based architect whose work stresses the intersection between architecture, urbanism, and semiotics. Together with Doina Petrescu, he founded atelier d’architecture autogérée (aaa), a professional organization that conducts actions and research on participatory urbanism and architecture involving local residents in self-managing projects in their neighbourhoods, engaging in social and ecological practices, and initiating resilient networks. aaa won the Zumtobel Prize for Sustainability and Humanity in 2012, the Curry Stone Design Prize in 2011, the European Prize for Urban Public Space in 2010, and the Prix Grand Public des Architectures contemporaines en Métropole Parisienne in 2010.

Anna Petersson is a senior lecturer in architecture at LTH, Lund University, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, with a research interest in material culture and the built environment as ritual and symbolic tools in processes of grief and remembrance.

Doina Petrescu is a professor of architecture and design activism at the University of Sheffield. Her cross-disciplinary research addresses architecture and urban planning, focusing on issues of civic participation and gender and the relations between co-production and resilience. She is the editor of Altering Practices: Feminist Politics and Poetics of Space (2007) and co-editor of The Social (Re)Production of Architecture (2017), Architecture and Participation (2005), Urban Act (2007), Agency: Working with Uncertain Architectures (2009), and Trans-Local-Act: Cultural Practices Within and Across (2010). Together with Constantin Petcou, she runs the practice atelier d’architecture autogérée (aaa).

Alessandro Petti is a professor of social justice at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm. Together with Sandi Hilal and Eyal Weizman, he founded Decolonizing Architecture (DA), an innovative think-and-act-tank based in Beit Sahour, Palestine. DA is at once a studio for spatial experimentation, a network for political research and discussion, and a lab for imagining a future in spite of everything. Together with Sandi Hilal, he is also the initiator of Campus in Camps, an educational programme founded to address the numerous urgent spatial and social interventions needed in Palestinian refugee camps (http://www.campusincamps.ps/about/).

Amy Rader Olsson, PhD, is the manager of IQ Samhällsbyggnad (The Swedish Centre for Innovation and Quality in the Built Environment), a Swedish membership organization for companies and organizations in the built environment sector that combines research and innovation with cross-boundary collaboration. She is the project leader of the strategic innovation programme Smart Built Environment and a researcher at KTH in Stockholm.

Karin Reisinger is an architect, educator, and postdoctoral fellow in critical studies in architecture at the KTH School of Architecture. She was educated in architecture and cultural studies and pursued her PhD (her thesis is entitled Grass Without Roots: Towards Nature Becoming Spatial Practice) at the Visual Culture Unit at Vienna UT. Her research has exposed the relationships between preservation and governmentality, colonialism, and issues of access. Feminist and post-human approaches support her critical perspectives in challenging ‘big history’. During her postdoctoral fellowship in Sweden, she has been investigating the archives and memories of mining societies applying methods of feminist political ecologies.

Klas Ruin is an architect based in Stockholm. Together with his partner Ola Broms Wessel, he runs the architectural practice Spridd. Spridd’s vision is that of ‘green social architecture’, which takes account of social relationships and human behaviour. Spridd believes that a resource-efficient approach to building entails evaluating what is really needed and seeking new approaches to sharing spaces, avoiding unnecessary construction, reusing where possible, and, when new construction is needed, planning thoroughly and economically to strengthen social relations. Klas also serves on the board of Mobile Art Production (MAP).

Jonas Runberger has been an artistic professor of digital design at Chalmers University of Technology since the fall of 2016. His main interests are architectural design, digital design methodologies and media, and the application of computational design in practice. He is involved in the master’s programme, and is developing research environments for digital design and architecture. He holds PhD and licentiate degrees from KTH (2012 and 2008, respectively). He is also head of Dsearch, a focus lab within White Arkitekter AB, and is a member of the board of White Research Lab.

Helen Runting is an urban planner (B.UPD) and urban designer (MSc.UPD), with a PhD in critical studies in architecture from KTH School of Architecture. Her research is situated within the field of architectural theory and addresses the “unbuilt environment” of Sweden’s architectural present.

Guttorm Ruud is a research fellow at the Institute of Form, Theory, and History at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), a member of the national board of the Norsk Bolig- og Byplanforening: BOBY (Norwegian Association for Housing and Planning), and coordinator of the Scandinavian Research Network for Welfare and Architecture. He has practiced as an architect for several years and has a master’s degree in urbanism. His PhD concentrated on economic and ideological crises and their relationships with changes in the physical manifestations of the welfare state.

Gunnar Sandin is an associate professor at the Department of Architecture and the Built Environment at LTH, Lund University. He is chair of the program committee of the Swedish national research school in architecture, ResArc. His research topics concern dialogue, aesthetics and artistic methods.

Ida Sandström is an architect and urban planner, as well as a PhD student at Lund University, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Department of Architecture and the Built Environment. Her current research engages with questions of urban diversity, institutional change, and the making of public space.

Meike Schalk is an associate professor of urban design and urban theory at KTH School of Architecture concerned with critical inquiry into issues of sustainability, democracy, and citizen participation in urban development processes, and practice-led research methods. She is a cofounder of Feminist Architecture Theory – Analysis Laboratory Education (FATALE).

Annie Locke Scherer is a doctoral researcher at KTH in architectural technologies. With a background in robotic fabrication and computational design in architecture, she has a dual masters from the University of Michigan (2014) and the Universität Stuttgart ITECH Program (2015). She has a special interest in geometry, parametric patterns, and fabrication. Her PhD research at KTH focuses on the integration of computational design with fabric formwork, parametric smocking, and concrete.

Bettina Schwalm is an experience designer, researcher, and educator, working in various institutional and corporate settings. Her work focuses on human behaviour, complex systems design, and organisational structures involving interdisciplinary collaboration. She explores the present and possible futures at a micro or systemic level through experience and narrative structures.

Secretary is an architecture office that was founded in 2017 by architects Karin Matz and Rutger Sjögrim, and urban planner and architectural theorist Helen Runting. All three teach at the School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm. The practice is built on a shared interest in the capacity of architecture to facilitate a dignified life at the scale of the population. Secretary aims to produce buildings, exhibitions, research studies, and megastructures that give form to the late welfare state in the 21st century.

Atli Magnus Seelow is an architect, architectural historian, and assistant professor in theory and history of architecture at Chalmers University of Technology. He received his doctorate 2009 at Architekturmuseum, Technische Universität München. His current research focuses on the relationship between technological innovation and architectural modernism.

Erik Sigge is an architectural historian and preservationist. He is editor of Lo-Res and a PhD candidate in architectural history and theory. 

Vasily Sitnikov is conducting research into architectural technologies, to expand the domain of digital fabrication with new material concepts and design strategies. This research developed from an interest in the industry of prefabricated concrete constructions, and seeks opportunities for radical innovations. 

Veronica Skeppe is a partner and founding member of Brrum. She is a lecturer at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. She has also been a lecturer in Furniture Design and Interior Architecture at Konstfack/University College of Arts, Crafts and Design.

Anne Solberg, PhD, is an associate professor at University College of Southeast Norway.

Jüri Soolep is an architect, as well as a researcher in the History and Theory of Architecture. His main research focus is spatial and architectural representations and their possible meanings. 

Erik Stenberg is an architect and associate professor in Architecture at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment in Stockholm, Sweden. During the 2016–2019 period, he is leading ERUF Grön BoStad Stockholm, an EU Structural Funds project with the aim of making the housing sector in Greater Stockholm smarter, greener, and more socially sustainable.

Lars-Henrik Ståhl is a professor in theoretical and applied aesthetics at LTH, Lund University. He is the director of the Swedish Research School in Architecture – ResArc. His scientific production has mainly been in architectural theory and philosophy, specifically addressing the role of aesthetics in contemporary society. Ståhl has been active in developing practice-based research in the field of architecture and design. Ståhl has been the leader of the practice-based research projects Los Angeles Islands: Architectonic Americaness and Placebo: Aesthetic Replacement Strategies in Sustainable Hospital Environments.

Apolonija Sustersic is an architect and visual artist with a PhD from Malmö Art Academy, Lund University, Sweden. She runs her own art/architecture studio practice in Oslo, Norway and Ljubljana, Slovenia. She is a professor of Visual Art at the Oslo Academy for the Arts, heading a new MFA programme, Art and Public Space. Her work concerns the critical analysis of space, usually focusing on the processes and relationships between institutions, cultural politics, urban planning, and architecture.

Pehr-Mikael Sällström, Lic, is a process leader, competency developer, and the head of education and research at the Swedish Association of Architects, where he is responsible for award scheme administration, the educational programme for professional development of architects, monitoring architectural education, promoting cultural heritage architectural competency, and exporting architecture services. He leads the Agenda Livsmiljö (‘agenda living environment’) initiative, which invests in research and innovation to advance innovative projects and services for a sustainable living environment for all.

Oliver Tessmann is a researcher at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm and a professor at TU Darmstadt heading the Digital Design Unit (DDU). His research and teaching concerns computational design, digital fabrication, and robotics.

Roemer van Toorn is an architect and professor of architecture theory, at UMA School of Architecture, Umeå, Sweden. He is a member of the Formas supported Strong Research Environment “Architecture in Effect” hosted by KTH in Stockholm. He has been in charge of the publication, history and theory program, and was head of the PhD research school at the Berlage Institute, the Netherlands. He was guest professor at the Technical University of Delft, and the Universität der Künste, Berlin, while at the same time pursuing a career as an international lecturer, researcher, writer and photographer.

Fredrik Torisson recently completed his doctoral thesis in architecture. His research focuses on the presuppositions and effects inherent in how we imagine the future.

Jilly Traganou is an architect and an associate professor in spatial design studies at Parsons School of Design in New York. Her work examines space and architecture in intersection with cultural studies, media studies, and design studies. Her current research treats design’s role in configuring national identities, and she is working on a book entitled Designing the Olympics: (Post)national identity in the Age of Globalization (to be published by Routledge). She is also now involved in the Routes and Homes project, supported by the Design and Social Science fund and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, in collaboration with Lydia Matthews, Gabriel Bendiner-Viani, and the Lower Manhattan Arts Academy (LoMA).

Fredrik Tygstrup is deputy head of the Department of Art and Cultural Studies at the University of Copenhagen.

Helena Westerlind is a PhD candidate at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment within the international research network Innochain. Her research focuses on the interplay between digital technologies and craft in material practice.

Albena Yaneva, an anthropologist of architecture with a PhD from École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris (2001), is a professor of architectural theory and the director of the Manchester Architecture Research Centre at Manchester University and currently a visiting professor at the Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Lund University. Her work crosses the disciplinary boundaries of architectural theory, science and technology studies, cognitive anthropology, and political philosophy. For her innovative use of ethnography in architectural discourses, she was awarded the RIBA President’s Award for Outstanding University-located Research (2010). Her most recent book is Mapping Controversies in Architecture (Ashgate, 2012), which is available as a teaching platform for studying controversies surrounding urban design.

Joanna Zawieja works in the intersection of art, architecture, and urban planning. She runs projects that focus on improving public space by trying new ways of working and addressing the social aspects of urban planning. Joanna Zawieja previously worked in architecture, collaborating with artists and cultural institutions. She is in charge of the urban development work of the Public Art Agency Sweden.

Malgorzata A. Zboinska, PhD, is an architect and designer with professional and academic interests in digitally-aided design. Her design and research work arises from those interests, taking on various forms, including digital artefacts, physical objects, and supportive texts, all of which elaborate on the synergy between human creativity and the power of computation.

Christina Zetterlund, PhD, is a professor and researcher in craft history and theory at the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm. She also works as a freelance curator and writer.

Leonardo Zuccaro Marchi developed a strong affinity for the urban topic the ‘Heart of the City’ – the theme of the CIAM8 – from both the historical as well as the theoretical perspectives. In 2013 he obtained a double PhD in Architecture from TU Delft and IUAV in Venice and in 2014–2015 he was a postdoctoral fellow at KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. He is currently a visiting lecturer at TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture and Built Environment.

Maria Ärlemo is an architect and PhD candidate in the Critical Studies division of the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm. She holds a Master’s degree in Architecture from KTH and has qualifications in ethnology from the University of Stockholm and in urban sociology from UC Berkeley, USA. Her PhD research explores local discourses on justice, as they have emerged in relation to ongoing processes of renovation in large-scale post-war housing areas in Sweden marked by economic and racial segregation.